Glossary >
mouth-to-mask-resuscitation

Mouth-to-mask: Rescue breathing, breaths per minute, rate, airway management, oxygen

Mouth-to-mask: Rescue breathing, breaths per minute, rate, airway management, oxygen

Mouth-to-mask rescue breathing is a technique used in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to provide oxygen to an unresponsive patient. It involves the rescuer placing a mask over the patient’s mouth and nose, then providing air breaths into the mask. This technique is used when it is not possible or safe for the rescuer to perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

 

  • Breaths per minute: The rate of breaths per minute should be 10–12 breaths per minute, with each breath lasting 1 second. The rescuer should provide enough air to make the chest rise visibly with each breath.
  • Airway management is important when performing mouth-to-mask rescue breathing. The rescuer should ensure that the head and neck are in a neutral position, with the chin slightly lifted and the jaw thrust forward, to open the airway as much as possible. If necessary, two fingers can be used to lift up on the bony part of the lower jaw (mandible) while pushing down on the forehead simultaneously.
  • Oxygen can be provided during mouth-to-mask rescue breathing by attaching an oxygen source such as an oxygen cylinder or bag valve mask (BVM) device to a nonrebreather mask or other appropriate device placed over the patient’s face. Oxygen delivery should be set at 15 liters per minute; however, if no oxygen source is available, room air can still be used for rescue breathing without additional equipment.
CPR AED and First Aid Certification. Get certified Now with the latest AHA guidelines.
Takes less than 20 minutes. learn more

Frequently Asked Questions

What do I do if there are no barrier devices available before performing CPR?

If no barrier devices are available on the scene, like a bag valve mask, it is up to you if you are comfortable doing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. If not, call 911 and perform chest compressions only or Hands-Only CPR. The American Heart Association recommends the Hands-Only CPR technique for lay rescuers who are not trained in CPR or are not comfortable giving rescue breaths.

If no barrier devices are available on the scene, like a bag valve mask, it is up to you if you are comfortable doing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. If not, call 911 and perform chest compressions only or Hands-Only CPR. The American Heart Association recommends the Hands-Only CPR technique for lay rescuers who are not trained in CPR or are not comfortable giving rescue breaths.

After the AED gives an electric shock, you still need to continue giving chest compressions and rescue breathing. You have two minutes to do the CPR steps before the AED instructs you to stand clear so that it may begin re-analyzing the heart rhythm to determine whether a second shock is necessary.

References

  • American Heart Association (2020). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Retrieved from https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/cardiac-arrest/cardiopulmonary-resuscitation--cpr
  • National Health Service UK (2020). Mouth To Mask Rescue Breathing – Adult And Child CPR – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance UK Retrieved from https://www.sja.org.uk/get-trained/first-aid/adultandchildcpr/mouthtomaskrescuebreathing