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Rescue breathing: Mouth-to-mouth, mouth-to-nose, mouth-to-mask, breaths per minute, rate

Rescue breathing: Mouth-to-mouth, mouth-to-nose, mouth-to-mask, breaths per minute, rate

Rescue breathing is a life-saving technique that provides breaths to a person who is not breathing or breathing adequately. Rescue breathing can be performed using various methods, including mouth-to-mouth, mouth-to-nose, or mouth-to-mask.

Mouth-to-mouth rescue breathing is the most common form of rescue breathing. This technique involves the rescuer placing their lips around the victim’s mouth and blowing air into it. The rescuer should pinch the victim’s nose shut with one hand while performing this technique.

Mouth-to-nose rescue breathing is similar to mouth-to-mouth, but instead of placing their lips around the victim’s mouth, the rescuer places them around their nose and blows air into it. Again, the rescuer should pinch the victim’s nose shut with one hand while performing this technique.

Mouth-to-mask rescue breathing is a variation of traditional rescue breathing that uses a special mask designed for CPR purposes. This mask fits over the victim’s nose and mouth and allows for more efficient air deliverythan traditional methods. The rescuer simply places their lips around the edges of the mask and blows air into it.

Rate: Regardless of the methodused, it is important to maintain a consistent rate when delivering breaths during CPR; typically, between 12 and 20 breaths per minute are recommended by American Heart Association.

Duration: It is also important to remember that each breath should last for about 1 second toensure that enough oxygen reaches the lungs.

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Frequently Asked Questions

When giving rescue breaths, does the unconscious person have to open their mouth when we have to breathe?

During rescue breathing, the unconscious person has to open their mouth to ensure that the air you breathe will reach the lungs. You will see the chest rise if the rescue breathing is effective. If not, you need to open the airway again using a head tilt/chin lift and give another rescue breath.

When giving rescue breaths, do I need to close the whole nose when giving breath to the victim's mouth?

Yes, you need to close the entire nose and make a proper seal with your mouth when giving rescue breath to the adult victim. This is to prevent the flow of air you provide from escaping.

In CPR, does rescue breath mean blowing air in the mouth?

Yes. Rescue breath means blowing air at the victim's mouth to provide them with the adequate ventilation they need. It can be carried out independently if the person is not breathing but has a pulse. It can also accompany chest compression if the victim doesn't have a pulse and normal breathing. It's essential to assess the patient properly to determine the appropriate procedure and make sure to follow the Chain of Survival steps.

After using AED, do I still need to perform rescue breath?

After the AED gives an electric shock, you still need to continue giving chest compressions and rescue breathing. You have two minutes to do the CPR steps before the AED instructs you to stand clear so that it may begin re-analyzing the heart rhythm to determine whether a second shock is necessary.

References

  • American Heart Association (2020). How To Perform Hands-OnlyCPR: Step By Step Instructions For Adults & Children [Online].
  • NHS Choices (2018). Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) [Online].